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NIMBY Issues


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This has been on my mind for a few weeks now. I live in an area that is experiencing a bit of growth. New subdivisions are spring up around the area. We're basically between two metropolitan areas and like most places the suburbs/exurbs are spreading.

The latest controversy is over a area of what was once formerly farm land. The owners have passed on and their children live out of the area. It's right off the interstate, and in what is still a fairly rural area. There are a couple of major subdivisions within a mile or so from the exit.

The family wants to have the land rezoned for multi use. The proposal includes a business/warehouse park. (That is another one nearby that is about 20 years old and has several vacant buildings). Also for shopping and more housing. A proposal for a truck stop was dropped from the original plan. It has raised the ire of long time residents who want to keep the rural flavor of the area.

I understand and respect the opponents side of the issue, but also wonder if its fair to deny the heirs a chance to gain from the sale of the land. If nothing happens the land will remain fallow, and eventually will become a big eyesore as weeds take over where corn and wheat used to grow. The heirs are also stuck with the expense of taxes.

While I don't want to see growth just for the sake of growth. Not to mention potential traffic issues. I'm not sure keeping the land empty is the correct approach either.

Where does free enterprise end and nimbyism take over? 

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I think in this case the burden is on those wanting to change the zoning to make their case as to how it will improve the area.  When you own farm land and it no longer has use or owners have the desire to farm there, then is that really the problem for the community?  Life is about taking risk and we have zoning for a reason.

There's also the dynamic of people moving out to "get away from it all" then they complain when thousands of others do the same thing they did.

 

 

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I don't think there is any easy answer.  But I really do wish communities would push to use land/buildings already available.  Even if they subsidize those, it saves from expanding the roads/sewers/electricity/etc to support the new buildings.  

It doesn't mean that heirs still can't sell their land, but rather they may only get what someone that wants to use the land to farm, hunt, or just has the cash for a big lot is willing to pay for it.

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On 1/13/2022 at 1:30 PM, oblong said:

I think in this case the burden is on those wanting to change the zoning to make their case as to how it will improve the area.  When you own farm land and it no longer has use or owners have the desire to farm there, then is that really the problem for the community?  Life is about taking risk and we have zoning for a reason.

There's also the dynamic of people moving out to "get away from it all" then they complain when thousands of others do the same thing they did.

 

 

If you have farmland in a farming area and you don’t want to work it, you can usually find someone else who will and that will usually pay your taxes and then some. Odds are at the least you aren’t going end up with some kind of terrible financial burden because of the evil state’s intransigence. 

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This is the latest update on the property

https://www.dailypress.com/virginiagazette/va-vg-jcc-planning-hazelwood-farms-0108-20220107-nbuovqgfxvg4hmtlexakdzyhem-story.html

What I hadn't realized is the property has been zoned for business the last 20 years or so. Personally, I like the concessions that have been made. Eliminate the proposed truck stop, and housing. 

Honestly, this part of the county could use another grocery, maybe a decent midscale restaurant (preferably locally owned) and shops. Maybe a medical facility.

I'm torn on warehouse and office space since an older business park has several openings that could probably be repurposed. 

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This seems like a good place to share this.

Quote

Speaking for Sunrise Amherst, a youth group focused on climate change and other issues, Jane Scanlan-Emigh of Pondview Drive said the major concern with large-scale solar projects is the potential deforestation that might take place.

DeAngelis said Amherst residents care about sustainability and renewable energy, but the town needs a bylaw that can set conditions for the appropriate placement of these projects and how they will be removed. Having strong and explicit guidelines will make them safer for the environment, DeAngelis said.

If you're working to change how energy is delivered in this country in a broad way, this strikes me as an absolutely insane position. It's a big reason why I often don't understand what climate activism seeks to accomplish.... it all just comes across as "zero development ever", which taken to it's logical end, basically means going back to the stone age.

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5 minutes ago, mtutiger said:

This seems like a good place to share this.

If you're working to change how energy is delivered in this country in a broad way, this strikes me as an absolutely insane position. It's a big reason why I often don't understand what climate activism seeks to accomplish.... it all just comes across as "zero development ever", which taken to it's logical end, basically means going back to the stone age.

This what happens when people can’t do the maths. Compared to other human activities such as farming and urban development, the areas needed for solar power are actually small. 

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4 minutes ago, gehringer_2 said:

This what happens when people can’t do the maths. Compared to other human activities such as farming and urban development, the areas needed for solar power are actually small. 

Absolutely. And from experience as an engineer, 100 acres is miniscule.... there are probably thousands of projects that are happening in this country on a daily basis that clear more acreage for activities that produce far more carbon than this project would.

Just dumb all around.... no wonder climate activism is pretty ineffective at winning hearts and minds.

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I was just reading a Washington Post story about the fight in Northern Virginia over a proposal to build a huge data storage center in rural Prince George County. That area has seen constant battles for at least 50 years now. From huge developments to a Disney theme park

https://www.washingtonpost.com/dc-md-va/2022/01/15/data-centers-prince-william-virginia/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=referral&utm_campaign=wp_local-virginia-politics

The thing is at least in portion the state a lot of "family farms" have given way to wineries, vineyards and craft breweries. In part thanks to state grants to wine growers when the tobacco industry started dying     

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